Mint Tin Mini Apocalypse (Saturday Review)

Release Date: 2015 Players: 2 (only)
Designer: Kate Beckett, David Rene Miller Length:  5-10 minutes
Artist: David Rene Miller Age: 10+
Publisher: subQuark Complexity: 1.0 / 5

Here is yet another mint tin game, simply because they pack such a huge punch in such a small package. Mint Tin Mini Apocalypse by subQuark is another game that comes in a small form factor mint tin, is really quick to learn and a lot of fun to play. It easily fits into virtually any pocket and doesn’t take up much table space, so you can have it with you anywhere and play it everywhere. It is a realtime game, which means there are no turns and both players take their actions continuously in order to win. It creates a lot of frantic excitement and hilarity for players of virtually all ages. Read more

Oaxaca: Crafts of a Culture (Saturday Review)

Release Date: 2018 Players: 1-4
Designer: Sarah and Will Reed Length:  30-45 minutes
Artist: Derek Bacon Age: 10+
Publisher: Undine Studios Complexity: 1.5 / 5

If you like dice action selection games where you slowly build up action combos, then Oaxaca: Crafts of a Culture by Undine Studios is for you. Now don’t be put off by dice rolling, because in this game you can easily mitigate bad luck and even bad rolls still give you plenty of opportunities. Oaxaca (“wa-ha-ka”) is also beautifully illustrated, quick to learn and really quick to play, while still maintaining enough interest even for very “serious” gamers. So there is something for everyone and one of the few games that I can confidently recommend for family gaming as well as regular games night groups. Read more

Bremerhaven (Saturday Review)

Release Date: 2013 Players: 1-4
Designer: Robert Auerochs Length:  60-120 minutes
Artist: Klemens Franz Age: 12+
Publisher: Lookout Spiele Complexity: 3.0 / 5

Here is another review of a game that is quite a few years old. Bremerhaven by Lookout Spiele is from 2013, so over five years old, but it is probably the only game with a secret bidding mechanism that really works, and lots of player interaction without making you feel helpless if the other players gang up on you. There is also a huge time element in the game, that keeps you on your toes. To top it all off, the game also has a really fun theme, beautiful illustrations and a really tense gameplay. As you can see, I really like the game, so let me explain a bit more. Read more

Scythe (Saturday Review)

Release Date: 2016 Players: 1-5
Designer: Jamey Stegmaier Length:  90-150 minutes
Artist: Jakub Różalski Age: 14+
Publisher: Stonemaier Games Complexity: 3.5 / 5

I know, Scythe by Stonemaier Games has been out since 2016 and has had a couple of expansions released as well, including promo packs with additional encounter cards. So chances are you have already heard plenty of reviews about this game and maybe own  it yourself, but I still felt it’s worth reviewing, because I am sometimes surprised by how many people still don’t know Scythe. Read more

Haspelknecht: The Story of Early Coal Mining (Saturday Review)

Release Date: 2015 Players: 2-4
Designer: Thomas Spitzer Length:  60-90 minutes
Artist: Johannes Sich Age: 12+
Publisher: Quined Games Complexity: 3.0 / 5

Haspelknecht: The Story of Early Coal Mining, to give it its full title, is a kind of action selection game by Quined Games set in the Ruhr region of Germany. The game is set at a time when the area was still covered by forests and coal was first discovered close to the surface. During the game your task is to dig up that coal until its depleted and you have to start digging deep pits to get to this precious resource. The great mechanism in this game is the action selection element, where you draw all tokens of one colour from one of a number of common pools at the start of each round. These tokens are then used to activate your workforce and develop new technologies. It sounds simple, but it creates a really complex, interesting game with lots of options and very few player interaction. Read more

War, huh, what is it good for?

Prompted by my recent review of Lincoln by PSC Games and Worthington Games, I wanted to discuss the topic of war as a theme in modern tabletop games. Depending on whether a game uses a real historic event as its backdrop, or creates a much more abstract scenario, people will react differently. Tackling the American Civil War, as Lincoln does, is very different to using a sci-fi setting with space ships. Many people simply don’t feel comfortable with games set in a dark time of history, while others don’t mind if the game recognizes what has happened and respects the terrible nature of the events from the past. Read more

Hit me

In many modern tabletop games there is a certain amount of player interaction. The term sounds quite positive. After all, playing games with others is often about interaction and the social aspect. However, the term is actually referring to situations where one player takes an action that directly affects another player. If the effect is negative it is called “take that”, and if it is positive it is called “have this”. Different players like different amounts or different types of player interaction. You can be a care bear or a warmonger. So let’s look at what these different types are and how they affect gameplay. Read more