Announcing Tabletop Inquisition Podcast

After a lot of work behind the scenes, I am excited to announce that Boardgame Inquisition and Tabletop Games Blog have joined forces to create Tabletop Inquisition, a topic based podcast. In each episode we’re going to tackle a different issue facing board games, the people who play them and maybe their industry. Read more

KeyForge: Call of the Archons (Saturday Review)

Release Date: 2018 Players: 2 (only)
Designer: Richard Garfield Length:  15-45 minutes
Artist: Age: 12+
Publisher: Fantasy Flight Games Complexity: 2.5 / 5

 

KeyForge: Call of the Archons by Fantasy Flight Games is the first Unique game – and the word “unique” has a very special meaning, but I will talk about this later. KeyForge, for short, is a competitive two-player-only card game where players aim to forge three keys, each costing six Æmber. As players draw and play cards, they can attack their opponent and collect Æmber. The player to first forge their third key is the winner. So far it’s very much like any other card game of their kind, but it is the uniqueness of the decks that is new and is what interests me about this game. Read more

Coming in 2019

Let me start by wishing you a Happy New Year. I hope you enjoyed the holidays and had a chance to relax and recharge. Now that 2019, it’s time to look ahead at my most anticipated games of the coming year. The list happens to consist purely of Kickstarter projects, because that is how I buy most of my games these days, but as the year goes on I will of course keep an eye other releases as well. The list is sorted in expected delivery order, rather than alphabetically or anything else. So here goes.

Chai by Deep Aqua Games

Expected delivery: January 2019 for the print-and-play, and September 2019 for the full game

The Kickstarter campaign for Chai by Deep Aqua Games is still going for a few more days, so you can check it out here and consider supporting it too: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/strider88/chaian-immersive-tea-board-game

As you will see from the review I wrote (see Chai (Saturday Review)) and the related review video (see https://youtu.be/3R7QEKthQhY), I absolutely love this game. I was lucky enough to playtest a print-and-play version of Chai, and once my wife and I tried it, we kept playing it at least once a day for a couple of weeks. Read more

Small is beautiful

The tabletop games industry has been booming for some years now. Back in September 2016, the The Guardian website describes how the Thirsty Meeples cafe in Oxford taps into “[t]he rise and rise of tabletop gaming” (1). In January 2017, the New Statesman website explains “[h]ow board games became a billion-dollar business” (2), and in December 2017 the Financial Review website describes how “the golden age of board games” (3) allows the Draughts game cafe in London to benefit from the popularity of boardgames and how the industry grew over time. Even as recently as April 2018, an article on the Bloomberg website (4) says that board game nights are the latest way to network. So the boom clearly continues, and it has made me wonder if small players, be they game publishers, designers or developers, rules writers, content creators, game cafe owners or games group or exhibiton organizers, still have a role in the industry. Read more

Sandcastles

The upcoming release of 8Bit Box by Iello is exciting people for a number of reasons. A new game from Iello is always exciting, and for this game there is of course the nostalgia. My first games console was an ATARI 2600, so I will certainly reminisce. However, and I think this is what is most exciting about this release, is that the game is designed to allow everyone to make their own games. Read more

Keep on rolling

Since the days of Yahtzee, roll-and-writes, as these games are now known, have made a huge comeback: Roll through the Ages by Matt LeacockKokoro: Avenue of the Kodama by Indie Boards and Cards, Harvest Dice by Grey Fox Games and the recent Railroad Ink by CMON are some of the many games in the genre. Read more

Touchy feely

Pretty much all tabletop games require the use of your senses – sight, hearing and touch at least. You need to look at the board or your cards, listen to what other players do and use your hands to move your meeples or roll dice. Many recent games incorporate elements to help colour blind people, and of course hearing is often not required and can be replaced with sign language. However, no modern tabletop game makes your senses an integral mechanism – that is, until the release of Nyctophobia: The Hunted by Pandasaurus Games. Read more

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