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Child’s Play (Topic Discussion)

It’s so very easy to dismiss the old adage that we learn through play. Many of us take our shared hobby very seriously. We’re highly competitive and want to win. We need to play by the rules. It’s an unwritten law – but it’s a law nevertheless. It’s “the law”. Yet, when we see how young children interact with games, it’s often very different to what we do as adults. In this article, I want to explore what we can learn from children and how it might help us rediscover the joy of board games.

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Junk Forts (Saturday Review)

Get your friends together, grab some bits from the local junkyard and assemble everything into the best stronghold you can, to be crowned champion of the Junk Forts by Matthew Dunstan and Brett J. Gilbert from Inside the Box Board Games.

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The Scientific Benefits of Tabletop Gaming (Topic Discussion)

As a kid, family game night was a staple and we had that one closet that always seemed to overflow with board games. As I got older, I added tabletop RPGs like Dungeons & Dragons and video games. And while gaming has always been a part of my lifestyle, I never really saw it as beneficial beyond just something to do for fun. But according to scientific research, tabletop gaming is actually quite good for you.

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Brian Boru: High King of Ireland (Saturday Review)

It is the 11th century AD and the Vikings regularly invade our lands, while my domestic rivals try to forcefully take territory from me, without much luck. My military prowess is well known and I prove myself again and again, while also forging political alliances by strategically arranging marriages between my family members and other important houses. I even have time to rebuild the many monasteries in my realm, bringing the Church and its wealth onto my side. My name is Brian Boru: High King of Ireland by Peer Sylvester from Osprey Games.

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Etiquette (Topic Discussion)

When you have a long-standing, regular games group, you will probably have already established certain “house rules” that define what’s considered good behaviour at the table. Chances are many of them are actually unwritten rules that have just come out over time and are based on the types of people you play with. In this article, I want to try and talk about a few of these rules that are probably generally useful to have at games night, whether this is with a long-established group or people you’ve just met.

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Suspects (Saturday Review)

After graduating from Oxford, specializing in criminal law, it was time for me to travel and see the world. Little did I know that every journey I took would present me with a mystery I had to solve using my formidable spirit of deduction and unfailing determination. Tiny clues would lead me along a trail of discovering more and more proof which would lead me to the perpetrator. However, until then, all the people I met were Suspects by Sebastien Duverger Nedellec, Paul Halter and Guillaume Montiage from Studio H.

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Pointless co-operation (Topic Discussion)

Staunch competitive players may feel that co-operative games are a bit pointless. After all, it makes more sense if there is only one winner, rather than several, or so their reasoning might go. However, even if you love co-operative games and even if you prefer them to competitive games, there are some games where you don’t feel like you’re achieving anything – and that might feel pointless to you. In this article, I want to look at this in a little more detail.

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Cryptid: Urban Legends (Saturday Review)

There is something hiding in the city. I’m sure of it. I keep finding clues and my detectors are picking up very strange signals – but I need proof! Hard facts that I can present to the science community to make them believe that I have found a Cryptid: Urban Legends by Hal Duncan and Ruth Veevers from Osprey Games.

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Rob Ingle (Let me illustrate)

Rob Ingle works for Stop, Drop and Roll Games Studio and has been an artist for a long time. As he says himself, he is straightforward, honest and punctual. He is skilled in illustration, design and all manner of creative work.

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Self-sorting games (Topic Discussion)

We all know how some games can take a while to set up. Sometimes it’s because there are just a lot of components and different pieces to take out of the box and place on the table. Other times, it’s because you have to sort components a certain way, after they were all mixed together in a previous play of the game. The opposite can also be true, where you have to shuffle tiles or cards, after they ended up all in order when you finished playing the game last time. In this article, I want to look at both: games that sort or shuffle themselves during play and are virtually immediately ready to play again, as well as games that expect you to shuffle or sort components before you can play them again.

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